t +61 2 9219 2002

Hi. You don't know me, but you saved my life. I don't know what I did to deserve it, I certainly haven't done much I am proud of, but you, a complete stranger, didn't give up on me.

AdobeStock 56924318 aaron SQUARE

I wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for you. I wouldn’t have a warm bed to sleep in, a reason to wake up in the morning, or a desire to wake up at all. You really did save my life.
 
Before Triple Care Farm, I was not a person you would want to know. I wouldn’t want to know me.  I was angry. I hated life and everything in it. I couldn’t stand people telling me I needed help and pushed anyone away that tried. I made my mum cry. I told her I hated her, that it was all her fault. I was hurtful. I’m too embarrassed to tell you just how hurtful I was, but I don’t know how she continued to see me as her son.
 
I quit school in year 9. I gave up before that but I kept going, convincing myself I had it all together. In the end I just didn’t care. I didn’t care about what people thought. I didn’t really care about anything.
 
Drugs numbed me. At first it was just something to do. I guess you could say it became a hobby, and then an addiction.
 
The drugs justified things in my head. I thought I had the right to hate my mum. I convinced myself I had really tried in life but that everything and everyone made me fail, it wasn’t my fault. I had given up.
 
One night I gave up on life. I tried to kill myself. It obviously wasn’t successful cause I am here writing to you, but I tried. It was at my mum’s place, in the bathroom. She found me. She cried again.
 
I had 2 choices. I could die, or I could give one last shot at this life thing. There was something in my mum’s face that made me think. I needed help.
You helped me, even though you didn’t know me. I didn’t deserve your help, I don’t know why you thought I did. But thank you.
 
Because of you I went to Triple Care Farm. I stopped using drugs. I started to care. It wasn’t an overnight change, don’t get me wrong, but I’m changing every day.
 
I’m not as angry anymore. I even got back into my education and achieved my school certificate. The woodwork room was one of my favourite places. I remember when I finished my first project, a simple box, and I felt really emotional. I felt really stupid for getting so emotional about making a box, but worked it out later with my counsellor – I was proud of myself. I didn’t know what that felt like.
 
I know you have invested your money into me, and I know you have hope for me. I don’t want to let you down. I want you to know I appreciate what you have done for me. I am alive today because you gave me the chance to go to Triple Care Farm.
 
I just got an apprenticeship, as a carpenter. I can’t believe this has happened to me. Life doesn’t have it in for me after all. I have a reason to get up every day now. I want to get my drivers licence and save up to take my mum on a small holiday, I think I owe it to her.
 
I owe my future to you. Thank you for seeing something in me that I couldn’t see in myself. If it wasn’t for you, I wouldn’t be here.

There were 17 other young people at the Farm with me. We all have our own stories, we all carry hurt and we have all hurt others. But we made that scary step to admit we needed help. I know there are heaps more people like us out there needing the same help we did.  I won’t give up, but I also ask that you don’t either.

I’m writing this letter to you today, not just to say thanks for saving my life, but to make sure you know what your support means. You haven’t just given me help to deal with my problems, you have given me a future.

 
Aaron

 

 

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